Posts Tagged With: humour

The Hawaii Diaries: Day 12 – Tantrums & Tsunamis

Day 12 – 25th October 2012 – Honolulu

Back to Waikiki and the beloved Banyan Tree. Ben andI go for a surf in the morning and in the afternoon to celebrate our last day in Hawaii. In between the surf, Dad and I go on a bit of a shopping spree fun.

My surfing has improved dramatically despite not being able to surf whilst on the cruise. During the afternoon surf session a man and a younger guy start to paddle for a wave that I’ve already started paddling hard for (and I’m much further out than them). As it is I’m paddling to the furthest left side of the hundreds of Waikiki surfers due to plain intimidation or fear of causing an accident. I decide to keep paddling towards these guys and I’m certain they must know surfing etiquette if I do, right? Since I can only surf in a straight line I’m sure they will veer away. Of course I was wrong – both guys stand on their boards less than a metre from me and keep going on the wave. As per usual I totally nosedive before even standing. On my way back out I see the older guy staring at me. As I keep paddling he says “I hope you are heading out that way”, indicating even further away from everyone else. I ask, “Why?” and he says “because you are DANGEROUS!” so again, not being a confrontational person I ask “why?” and he says I almost crashed into two people.

Not quite understanding whether I was in the wrong and being too scared to stand up for myself I paddled off, heart beating hard. Ben was out further so I paddled to him and explained what had happened. We could see the man was making snide remarks about me to the younger guy and I was getting really worked up! Ben slowly paddled closer to the guy to try and overhear him and then caught a wave. Unsurprisingly, the older guy cut in on Ben too but mid way when they are both standing Ben calls out “my sister isn’t dangerous!”, unfortunately the older guy didn’t hear him and when they were paddling back out he called, “what’d ya say buddy?” and Ben repeated himself. What prevailed was quite amusing, although not at the time. Ben and the older guy had a bit of a splashing war. The man finally heads into shore and I’m scared he has gone to get back up. I’ve now lost my confidence  and so decide to head in. Ben says he will follow me. I can’t find Ben on the shore when I’ve handed in my board for at least another 30 minutes. Watching the sunset I’m starting to visualise this guy getting some island friends to come and sort my brother out. Contemplating my options he finally comes in – Phew!! Crisis over. I will be practicing my surfing in isolation now.

Looking back this is the funniest story of the trip. It was just so comedic watching them splash around – both as serious as the other. Needless to say I haven’t been surfing since.

If only that was the most eventful part of the day…

We go to Waikiki’s only revolving restaurant for dinner. It’s the best food we’ve had so far. During our meal our waiter tells us there has been a 7.7 magnitude earthquake in Canada and all of Hawaii has a tsunami warning! We are used to warnings that never eventuate having grown up in Papua New Guinea, New Zealand and Queensland so we don’t rush back to the hotel. When we get there we go to our separate rooms after the concierge has assured us it is likely nothing will eventuate. Mum starts stressing out and comes to our room yelling that we are going to be evacuated and to start packing up because we need to find a hill. Her eyes are wide and wild. She spends too much time listening to crazy people in the lifts. We finally convince her to leave our room.

It’s one hour until the supposed tsunami will hit and Ben and I have the news on. It seems like a very serious matter as it is all that is on TV. There are reports that tsunami alarms have failed to go off on some of the islands and as there was a bad tsunami the year before after the Japan earthquake everyone is on edge. Ben and I are still convinced that it is a false alarm when mum calls us again pleading for us to come to the sixth floor. We refuse as are beds are so comfy and we are absolutely exhausted.

Finally, after another four calls mum and dad decide to knock on our door. Dad calls reception and they tell us we should have heard the warnings to evacuate (none of us heard any announcements) and that we needed to immediately head to the ballroom. When we get there people are prepared for the long-haul – Food and water rations are being provided which everyone rushes too and greedily takes more than their fair share, even though they would have just eaten dinner. Bedding is also supplied. It’s like a scene from a movie and I can imagine everyone slowly plotting against each other to ensure their own survival.

People are finding their own space where they can and creating make-shift beds or gathering around the TV. We finally realise this isn’t going to go away easily so I go to sleep under the table. I’m woken at 1am and told it is all over. The tsunami never hit, although waves were reported to be larger than normal.

Off to bed silently hoping our flight home tomorrow is cancelled. Unfortunately it wasn’t.

– Wish you were here xx

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Patong is a Lady (boy) of the night

The heat hits you like a slap in the face as you walk out of Phuket airport. Thai men are lined up along the airport pick up area all vying for your attention, “Where are you going miss? I take you there!” Luckily, I had received the best piece of advice I’ve needed to date from my friend Moff – keep your head down and walk straight to the metered taxis!  Finding the whole scene so hectic and surreal I tried to reason with the men, “Sorry I have a ride already.”

“Who with?” they replied.

“I am going to take a metered taxi”

“There are none!” a particularly brazen man pointed to a stand that had ‘Taxi Meter’ emblazoned across the top, which to my horror had a sign ‘No Taxis’.

“I’m just going to go talk to him and come back ok” and I wandered away. Arriving at the stand I inquired, “are there really no taxis?!’

‘Where you going’ the man replied so fast I could hardly understand him.

“Patong” and I showed him the address.

“500 baht! You wait!”

And so I waited about twenty minutes by the taxi stand taking in my surroundings. Others were doing the same as me, some having the luck I did and others being turned away for unapparent reasons as it seems I wasn’t the only ones having the language problems with the fast-talking taxi-dealer.

The window of the taxi stand was roughly pushed open “Miss your taxi two minutes away! Go now!” Being said incredibly fast so I can only assume this is what was said.

Getting in the air conditioned taxi was like finding heaven on earth. The heat in Phuket at even 8:30pm was incredible, and such a dry heat that I could feel my clothes sticking to me immediately.

My taxi driver was all smiles but unfortunately spoke little English. I was disappointed as I was hoping he would double as a tour guide as I took in Phuket through the window. He did try though and pointed out things he thought I would be interested in, “Shopping Outlet” he said gesturing eagerly, followed by “Sea Pearl Resort” for which the entrance was quite magnificent set against the run down surrounds we were driving through. I followed up with an obligatory “ohhh, wow” and he was pleased with himself. There was a huge billboard for a Fantasea show and my tour guide pointed and said “Show!”, “Good show?” I replied. “Yes, good show” (I have since been warned by another friend that this is not the case). This was the extent of our conversation, although it was a blessing in disguise; I was exhausted from a day of traveling and trying to take in everything I could.

The cars are the king of the roads, swerving and ignoring lanes and speed limits. My heart only stopped about three times – I take this to mean my taxi driver was a good driver. Scooters outnumber the cars and have their own lanes – they are chaotic, and many, each with anywhere between one and four (probably more) passengers, and some with so much cargo that I wouldn’t have thought would fit in a car let alone a scooter. Some of the locals didn’t wear helmets and I shook my head – they must have more luck than me on those things.

For a Monday night there were people everywhere. It appears Phuket, especially Patong, never sleeps – it is a lady (boy) of the night and through it’s boisterous charm and smiling, friendly people it has utterly seduced me.

*Meter taxi to Patong Terrace Boutique Hotel was quoted as 500 baht and ended up costing 312 Baht. Knowing that tipping is customary but still getting used to the currency I still paid 500 Baht and was offered no change, although satisfied with the drive I decided to let it slide.

Categories: Musings, Thailand, Travel Diary, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment

A note for my father…

Dear dad,

If I happen to go missing somewhere among the crazy streets of Bangkok, the remote Koh Tao island, the isolated Kerala backwaters, or trekking through the Himalayas please watch the movies below and do exactly what Liam Neeson does.

Love,

Abby xx

P.S. You can consider me missing if you haven’t heard from me for three consecutive days… not three consecutive minutes.

                        image                                              film-poster

Categories: Musings, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment

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